Museum 2.0

Ask me anything   As a student at the University of Antwerp I wrote my thesis on Holocaust Memory in the era of digital and on-line media. Here, on this page, I collect all videos, pictures, texts and other information that are useful for my research.

escapekit:

The Jewish Museum

Design studio Sagmeister & Walsh has created striking new visual identity for the Jewish Museum in New York City. 

(Source: sagmeisterwalsh.com, via savilleandknight)

— 2 months ago with 226 notes

rootsandruins:

"on ne parvient pas deux fois" (Balzac)

— 6 months ago with 1 note

Le passé qui ne passe pas

— 10 months ago with 3 notes
"Plus encore qu’une territoire, une langue, une religion ou un régime, une nation, c’est une mémoire"
Pascal Ory
— 10 months ago with 2 notes
This is a masterful volume on remembrance and war in the twentieth century. Jay Winter locates the fascination with the subject of memory within a long-term trajectory that focuses on the Great War. Images, languages, and practices that appeared during and after the two world wars focused on the need to acknowledge the victims of war and shaped the ways in which future conflicts were imagined and remembered. At the core of the “memory boom” is an array of collective meditations on war and the victims of war, Winter says.The book begins by tracing the origins of contemporary interest in memory, then describes practices of remembrance that have linked history and memory, particularly in the first half of the twentieth century. The author also considers “theaters of memory”—film, television, museums, and war crimes trials in which the past is seen through public representations of memories. The book concludes with reflections on the significance of these practices for the cultural history of the twentieth century as a whole.
Jay Winter is Charles J. Stille Professor of History, Yale University. He is author or coauthor of a dozen books, including Sites of Memory, Sites of Mourning: The Great War in European Cultural History.

http://yalepress.yale.edu/book.asp?isbn=9780300110685

This is a masterful volume on remembrance and war in the twentieth century. Jay Winter locates the fascination with the subject of memory within a long-term trajectory that focuses on the Great War. Images, languages, and practices that appeared during and after the two world wars focused on the need to acknowledge the victims of war and shaped the ways in which future conflicts were imagined and remembered. At the core of the “memory boom” is an array of collective meditations on war and the victims of war, Winter says.

The book begins by tracing the origins of contemporary interest in memory, then describes practices of remembrance that have linked history and memory, particularly in the first half of the twentieth century. The author also considers “theaters of memory”—film, television, museums, and war crimes trials in which the past is seen through public representations of memories. The book concludes with reflections on the significance of these practices for the cultural history of the twentieth century as a whole.

Jay Winter is Charles J. Stille Professor of History, Yale University. He is author or coauthor of a dozen books, including Sites of Memory, Sites of Mourning: The Great War in European Cultural History.

http://yalepress.yale.edu/book.asp?isbn=9780300110685

— 10 months ago
The Ideal and the Real

The Ideal and the Real

The Idea of Justice

By Amartya Sen

(Harvard University Press, 467 pp., $29.95)

In his introduction to The Idea of Justice, Amartya Sen asks the reader to imagine a scenario that will figure prominently throughout the book. Three children are arguing among themselves about which one of them should have a flute. The first child, Anne, is a trained musician who can make the best use of the flute. The second child, Bob, is the poorest of the three and owns no other toys or instruments. Clara, the third contender, happens to be the one who, with hard sustained labor, made the flute. Since philosophers try to reason about such distributive problems, each of the children can enlist support from a grand theory of justice that originated in what seems to be an impartial position in moral philosophy.

(…)
http://www.newrepublic.com/article/environment-and-energy/the-ideal-and-the-real

— 10 months ago
"Memory is history seen through affect. And since affect ist subjective, it is difficult toexamine the claims of memory in the same wayas we examine the claims of history. History is a discipline. We learn and teach its rules and its limits. Memory is a faculty. We live with it, and at times are sustained by it. Less fortunate are people overwhelmed by it. But this set of distinctions ought not lead us to conclude, along with a number of French scholars from Halbwachs to Nora, that history and memory are set in isolation, each on its separate peak."
Jay winter, The Performance of the Past: Memory, History, Indentity (in:Performing the Past)
— 10 months ago
History and Memory | The Yale Center for Media and Instructional Innovation →

Online course on trauma, memorials and history

How do individuals, families and nations mourn and commemorate tragedy? What kinds of memorials, imagery and language best represent war? These questions underlie “History and Memory,” an online course developed in partnership with AllLearn, the nonprofit distance education initiative. The eight-week course is based on a graduate seminar offered at Yale by history professor Jay Winter.

The CMI2 developed a range of media elements for the course, including weekly video lectures and image slide-shows. Externally produced media including video testimony by a Holocaust survivor, a segment on “shell shock” from a PBS documentary, and a host of music files, were transcoded into formats readily accessible through the course’s web interface.

The course presented a number of firsts: incorporation of so many different media elements, shooting weekly video segments in remote locations, and experimentation with high-definition video technology. The HD format was selected for its ability to capture the finest visual details, which was especially important during the shoot at Ground Zero in downtown Manhattan just a year after the collapse of the World Trade Center towers. Locations also included the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., as well as the Superior Courthouse closer to home in downtown New Haven.

While the HD video technology was an important step forward for Yale video production, the media were always in the service of the educational goals of the course: “More than the 1080i HD technology, this project is about high-definition content,” CMI2 Director Paul Lawrence explained. “It was paramount that this technology enhance Professor Winter’s narrative and not become a gimmick.”

— 10 months ago

interesting lecture of Robert-JAn van Pelt about the architecture and planning of Auschwitz-Birkenau @ KazerneDossin.

— 11 months ago
israelphotos:

Yad Vashem by ~philipp-eos
Yad Vashem (Hebrew: יד ושם) is Israel’s official memorial to the Jewish victims of the Holocaust, established in 1953 through the Yad Vashem Law passed by the Knesset, Israel’s parliament. Read on @ Wikipedia.

israelphotos:

Yad Vashem by ~philipp-eos

Yad Vashem (Hebrew: יד ושם) is Israel’s official memorial to the Jewish victims of the Holocaust, established in 1953 through the Yad Vashem Law passed by the Knesset, Israel’s parliament. Read on @ Wikipedia.

— 1 year ago with 12 notes
Gemälde von Anselm Kiefer, Schwarze Flocken
Schwarze Flocken
Schnee ist gefallen, lichtlos. Ein Mond  ist es schon oder zwei, dass der Herbst unter mönchischer Kutte                              Botschaft brachte auch mir, ein Blatt aus ukrainischen Halden:                      
 
„Denk, dass es wintert auch hier, zum tausendstenmal nun im Land, wo der breite Strom fließt: Jaakobs himmlisches Blut, benedeiet von Äxten…                                                      O Eis von unirdischer Röte – es watet ihr Hetman mit allem                            Troß in die finsternden Sonnen… Kind, ach ein Tuch,                                      mich zu hüllen darein, wenn es blinket von Helmen,                                          wenn die Scholle, die rosige, birst, wenn schneeig stäubt das Gebein                         deines Vaters, unter den Hufen zerknirscht                                                                    das Lied von der Zeder…                                                                                               Ein Tuch, ein Tüchlein nur schmal, dass ich wahre                                                      nun, da zu weinen du lernst, mein Kind, deinem Kinde!“                                            
 
Blutete, Mutter, der Herbst mir hinweg, brannte der Schnee mich: sucht ich mein Herz, dass es weine, fand ich den Hauch, ach des Sommers,    war er wie du.                                                                                                                  Kam mir die Träne. Webt ich das Tüchlein.
Ein Gedicht von Paul Celan, Schwarze Flocken
 

Gemälde von Anselm Kiefer, Schwarze Flocken

Schwarze Flocken

Schnee ist gefallen, lichtlos. Ein Mond
ist es schon oder zwei, dass der Herbst unter mönchischer Kutte                             
Botschaft brachte auch mir, ein Blatt aus ukrainischen Halden:                     

 

„Denk, dass es wintert auch hier, zum tausendstenmal nun
im Land, wo der breite Strom fließt:
Jaakobs himmlisches Blut, benedeiet von Äxten…                                                    
O Eis von unirdischer Röte – es watet ihr Hetman mit allem                         
Troß in die finsternden Sonnen… Kind, ach ein Tuch,                                    
mich zu hüllen darein, wenn es blinket von Helmen,                                        
wenn die Scholle, die rosige, birst, wenn schneeig stäubt das Gebein                      
deines Vaters, unter den Hufen zerknirscht                                                                  
das Lied von der Zeder…                                                                                             
Ein Tuch, ein Tüchlein nur schmal, dass ich wahre                                                     
nun, da zu weinen du lernst, mein Kind, deinem Kinde!“                                           

 

Blutete, Mutter, der Herbst mir hinweg, brannte der Schnee mich:
sucht ich mein Herz, dass es weine, fand ich den Hauch, ach des Sommers, 
war er wie du.                                                                                                               
Kam mir die Träne. Webt ich das Tüchlein.

Ein Gedicht von Paul Celan, Schwarze Flocken

 

— 1 year ago with 1 note

A new panorama by Yadegar Asisi opened in Berlin on Sunday 23 September.

(Source: andberlin.com)

— 1 year ago

JAN VANRIET
Gezichtsverlies
15.05.2010 - 27.06.2010



Onder de titel Gezichtsverlies toont Vanriet een kleine reeks portretten van gedeporteerden uit de Dossinkazerne te Mechelen. Hij baseert zich hiervoor op een monumentale publicatie van de Vrije Universiteit Brussel en het Joods Museum voor Deportatie en Verzet in Mechelen: Mecheln-Auschwitz 1942-1944. Het gaat om vier boeken met meer dan achttienduizend foto’s van mensen die tijdens de Tweede Wereldoorlog zijn weggevoerd naar de Duitse kampen.De serie is een evident vervolg op vorige tentoonstellingen zoals Transport en Meikever, Vlieg!, die samen een indrukwekkend hedendaags verhaal vertellen over het menselijk tekort.Vanriets oeuvre combineert een veelheid aan inhoudelijke thema’s (religie, geweld, machtsmisbruik) met uiteenlopende stijlkenmerken (van figuratief tot abstract, van minimalistisch tot exuberant). Inspiratie vindt hij in het verleden van zijn familie, in de samenleving en in de kunstgeschiedenis.Van 24 april tot 17 oktober brengt het Koninklijk Museum voor Schone Kunsten Antwerpen (KMSKA) in de tentoonstelling Closing Time het werk van Jan Vanriet samen met stukken uit de museumverzameling. Ook hier zullen werken geëxposeerd worden uit de reeks Gezichtsverlies.Van 25 juni tot 19 september brengt het Museum Plantin-Moretus te Antwerpen in


de tentoonstelling De Groet tekeningen van Jan Vanriet samen met werk uit de collectie Prentenkabinet.In 1972 studeerde Jan Vanriet af aan de Koninklijke Academie in Antwerpen. Op talloze tentoonstellingen in binnen- en buitenland werd plastisch werk van hem gepresenteerd. De kunstenaar nam ondermeer deel aan de befaamde Biënnales van Menton, Sao Paulo en Venetië. Vanriet publiceerde een aantal dichtbundels en schreef onder andere voor Vrij Nederland en Avenue . Het Museum voor Schone Kunsten in Antwerpen en de Museums of Contemporary Art in Seoul en San Diego namen werken van Vanriet in hun collectie op. Sinds 1987 ontwerpt de kunstenaar ook decors: voor Behoud de Begeerte en Geletterde Mensen ondermeer. Op diverse plekken is monumentaal werk van hem geïntegreerd: een plafondschildering in de inkomhal van de Antwerpse Bourla-schouwburg en muurschilderingen in de hoofdzetel van de Kredietbank in Brussel, in het Brusselse metrostation De Brouckère en in het Brusselse Roularta Media Centre. Verder ontwerpt Vanriet omslagen voor romans en tijdschriften, illustreert hij literaire uitgaven en verzorgt hij columns.> www.janvanriet.com

JAN VANRIET

Gezichtsverlies

15.05.2010 - 27.06.2010

Onder de titel Gezichtsverlies toont Vanriet een kleine reeks portretten van gedeporteerden uit de Dossinkazerne te Mechelen. Hij baseert zich hiervoor op een monumentale publicatie van de Vrije Universiteit Brussel en het Joods Museum voor Deportatie en Verzet in Mechelen: Mecheln-Auschwitz 1942-1944. Het gaat om vier boeken met meer dan achttienduizend foto’s van mensen die tijdens de Tweede Wereldoorlog zijn weggevoerd naar de Duitse kampen.
De serie is een evident vervolg op vorige tentoonstellingen zoals Transport en Meikever, Vlieg!, die samen een indrukwekkend hedendaags verhaal vertellen over het menselijk tekort.
Vanriets oeuvre combineert een veelheid aan inhoudelijke thema’s (religie, geweld, machtsmisbruik) met uiteenlopende stijlkenmerken (van figuratief tot abstract, van minimalistisch tot exuberant). Inspiratie vindt hij in het verleden van zijn familie, in de samenleving en in de kunstgeschiedenis.

Van 24 april tot 17 oktober brengt het Koninklijk Museum voor Schone Kunsten Antwerpen (KMSKA) in de tentoonstelling Closing Time het werk van Jan Vanriet samen met stukken uit de museumverzameling. Ook hier zullen werken geëxposeerd worden uit de reeks Gezichtsverlies.

Van 25 juni tot 19 september brengt het Museum Plantin-Moretus te Antwerpen in

de tentoonstelling De Groet tekeningen van Jan Vanriet samen met werk uit de collectie Prentenkabinet.

In 1972 studeerde Jan Vanriet af aan de Koninklijke Academie in Antwerpen. Op talloze tentoonstellingen in binnen- en buitenland werd plastisch werk van hem gepresenteerd. De kunstenaar nam ondermeer deel aan de befaamde Biënnales van Menton, Sao Paulo en Venetië. Vanriet publiceerde een aantal dichtbundels en schreef onder andere voor Vrij Nederland en Avenue . Het Museum voor Schone Kunsten in Antwerpen en de Museums of Contemporary Art in Seoul en San Diego namen werken van Vanriet in hun collectie op. Sinds 1987 ontwerpt de kunstenaar ook decors: voor Behoud de Begeerte en Geletterde Mensen ondermeer. Op diverse plekken is monumentaal werk van hem geïntegreerd: een plafondschildering in de inkomhal van de Antwerpse Bourla-schouwburg en muurschilderingen in de hoofdzetel van de Kredietbank in Brussel, in het Brusselse metrostation De Brouckère en in het Brusselse Roularta Media Centre. Verder ontwerpt Vanriet omslagen voor romans en tijdschriften, illustreert hij literaire uitgaven en verzorgt hij columns.


> www.janvanriet.com

(Source: galeriezwarthuis.be)

— 1 year ago